What to know about hair follicle drug tests

Employers, lawyers, and medical professionals are showing increased interest in hair follicle drug tests because they can determine if a person has been using illicit drugs or misusing prescription medications.

In this article, we discuss how hair follicle drug tests work, how to use a home kit, and what the results mean. We also cover the accuracy and cost of testing, whether people without hair can still provide a sample, and how hair follicle tests compare to traditional urine-based drug tests.

What is a hair follicle drug test?

A hair follicle drug test can determine patterns of illicit drug use or prescription medication misuse over a certain period — this is typically 3 months for hair samples that come from a person’s head.

Full story at Medical News Today

Cascade of Care model recommended for opioid crisi

A team of NIDA-funded scientists has offered a critical look at how to build an improved framework of care for the identification and treatment of people with opioid use disorder (OUD).

Building upon the successful Cascade of Care model developed in 2017 to manage patients with HIV and AIDS, the study authors lay out a plan to expand OUD prevention and care at the state and federal levels, while customizing services to fit the unique needs of individuals and their communities. The authors recommend a framework that encompasses four interrelated domains: prevention, identification, treatment and recovery. People at varying stages of risk and need reside at various points within that cascading framework.

Full story at drugabuse.org

Through my eyes: Addiction and recovery

Growing up, I had the picture-perfect family. I lived in a beautiful home in the suburbs of Detroit with my parents and younger brother. I had every opportunity in the world, attended private schools, and even made it onto the honor roll. I was involved in dance, theater, and many of the school sports teams.

Beneath the surface, however, I always felt a lot of pressure to be perfect.

I was the first of 12 grandchildren, and this led to me feeling that I had to be the best at everything I did, which gave me terrible anxiety from the early age of 5.

Full story at Medical News Today

Commentary: Changing Your Personal Narrative in Recovery

It’s a common misconception among those entering treatment that their goal is to stop drinking or using. However, ending your substance use is the beginning of a much longer journey. Once the brain starts to heal, life comes into focus, and with the clarity to see the far-reaching effects of their addiction, people realize they are in a truly transformative process.

We begin to form both negative and positive ideas about ourselves at a very young age, all influenced by genetics, environment, past experiences and society. As we grow, those ideas become a pattern of thoughts that form well-worn pathways in our brain. These make up our self-perception, or, our personal narratives.

Full story at drugfree.org

Survey Finds Many Positive Aspects to Recovery

There are many positive aspects to being in recovery, suggests a new survey of people who are experiencing recovery from alcohol or drug problems. The findings of the national survey of more than 9,000 people will help both people in recovery, and those who treat them, according to the researchers.

Currently there is no agreement about the definition of recovery, says lead researcher Lee Ann Kaskutas, DrPH, of the Public Health Institute’s Alcohol Research Group in Emeryville, California. Many people believe it requires total abstinence from drugs and alcohol, while others do not. “Most of what we know about the definition of recovery has come from scientists and expert panels, not from people in recovery,” she says.

Full story of aspects of recovery at drugfree.org