Survey Finds 29% of College Students Think ADHD Drugs Help School Performance

A survey of college students finds 29 percent mistakenly think drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increase school performance.

An additional 38 percent are unsure of the drugs’ effects on school performance, HealthDay reports.

There is no evidence that stimulant medications such as Ritalin and Adderall are effective study aids, the article notes. The survey included almost 7,300 students, none of whom had been diagnosed with ADHD.

Full story at drugfree.org

Nonmedical Use of Prescription Stimulants Provides No Academic Benefits: Study

A new study adds to the growing body of research indicating that nonmedical use of prescription stimulants for students without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) likely provides no academic benefits.

Many students use prescription ADHD drugs such as Ritalin or Adderall in response to academic difficulties, thinking these drugs will help them improve their grades, according to the researchers from the College Life Study at the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

Full story of ADHD drugs and academic benefits study at drugfree.org