Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Women Who Inject Drugs: Risks, Experiences, and Needs

Women who inject drugs have substantially different needs and face higher risks of disease and violence than do men who inject drugs.  This CE course seeks to illuminate the many reasons a focus on drug-injecting women is important, including their significantly higher mortality rates, increased likelihood of facing injecting-related problems, faster progression from first use to dependence, higher rates of HIV, increased risky injection and/or sexual risk behaviors.

Prevention of Youth Violence and Risk Associated Behaviors

Youth violence is a significant public health problem that affects thousands of young people each day, and in turn, their families, schools, and communities.  This CEU course includes programs, practices, and policies with evidence of impact on youth violence victimization, perpetration, and risk or protective factors for youth violence.

Pharmacological Management of Schizophrenia

This CEU course provides recommendations for treatment of inmates in federal facilities who are diagnosed with chronic psychotic disorders.

Child Welfare and Human Trafficking

Often, the lack of stability in a child’s living situation, physical distance from friends and family, and emotional vulnerability put them at risk for traffickers who are actively seeking children and teens to exploit.  This CEU course provides a broad overview of the crossover between the child welfare field and the work currently being done to prevent and respond to human trafficking of children and youth in the United States.

Full more on these new courses and many more, visit Quantum Units Education

 

Alcohol use in veterans with schizophrenia less common than thought; no level safe

U.S. military veterans who are being treated for schizophrenia are much less likely to drink any alcohol than the general population. However, they are equally likely to misuse alcohol. And when they do misuse alcohol, it leads to worsening of their symptoms, according to a new study led by Dr. Alexander Young, a psychiatry professor at UCLA.

Alcohol and drug use disorders are believed to have substantial negative effects on outcomes in people with schizophrenia. However, it has not been possible to know the extent of this problem, because diagnoses and details regarding substance use are typically not documented in people’s medical records, previous research shows.

Prior studies of veterans with serious mental illness have found that heavy drinking prevents them from sticking to prescribed medication regimens. Efforts to reduce alcohol misuse and better ensure that veterans with schizophrenia take their medications would improve outcomes for them and could reduce the incidence of hospitalization.

Full story of veteran alcohol use with schizophrenia at Science Daily

Difficulty assessing effort drives motivation deficits in schizophrenia, study finds

Individuals with schizophrenia often have trouble engaging in daily tasks or setting goals for themselves, and a new study from San Francisco State University suggests the reason might be their difficulty in assessing the amount of effort required to complete tasks.

The research, detailed in an article published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, can assist health professionals in countering motivation deficits among patients with schizophrenia and help those patients function normally by breaking up larger, complex tasks into smaller, easier-to-grasp ones.

“This is one of the first studies to carefully and systematically look at the daily activities of people with schizophrenia — what those people are doing, what goals are they setting for themselves,” said David Gard, an associate professor of psychology at SF State who has spent years researching motivation and emotion. “We knew that people with schizophrenia were not engaging in a lot of goal-directed behavior. We just didn’t know why.”

Full story of motivation and schizophrenia at Science Daily

Warning signs parents can’t ignore

A state senator stabbed, his son dead from a gunshot wound.

A tragedy, to be sure. But for many parents of children struggling with mental illness — a wrenching experience in itself — it can be a truly chilling scenario.

Virginia State Police on Tuesday said Sen. Creigh Deeds was stabbed after an altercation with his 24-year-old son, Austin “Gus” Deeds. The younger man then shot himself, authorities said.

Austin Deeds withdrew from The College of William & Mary last month after being enrolled off and on since 2007, according to a statement from the school.

The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported Tuesday that he had received a mental health evaluation under an emergency custody order on Monday, but was released because no psychiatric bed could be found in the area.

The vast majority of young adults with mental health issues do not become violent, although young adulthood is typically when symptoms of mental illness, including schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, surface, experts say.

Full story of mental health warning signs at CNN Health

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education

Folate and Vitamin B12 Reduce Disabling Schizophrenia Symptoms in Some Patients

Adding the dietary supplements folate and vitamin B12 to treatment with antipsychotic medication improved a core symptom component of schizophrenia in a study of more than 100 patients. The study focused on negative symptoms of schizophrenia — which include apathy, social withdrawal, and a lack of emotional expressiveness. While the level of improvement across all participants was modest, results were more significant in individuals carrying specific variants in genes involved with folate metabolism. The report from a team based at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) will appear in the journal JAMA Psychiatry(formerly Archives of General Psychiatry) and has been issued online.

“The symptoms of schizophrenia are complex, and antipsychotic medications provide no relief for some of the most disabling parts of the illness. These include negative symptoms, which can be particularly devastating,” says Joshua Roffman, MD, MMSc, of the MGH Department of Psychiatry, corresponding author of the JAMA Psychiatry paper. “Our finding that folate plus vitamin B12 supplementation can improve negative symptoms opens a new potential avenue for treatment of schizophrenia. Because treatment effects differed based on which genetic variants were present in each participant, the results also support a personalized medical approach to treating schizophrenia.”

Full story of B12 reducing schizophrenia symptoms at Science Daily

Beedie Savage – President of Quantum Units Education