Vitamin D deficiency increases schizophrenia risk

Some research suggests a link between low vitamin D levels and a person’s risk of developing schizophrenia. New evidence indicates that this notion may be correct.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, schizophrenia is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide.

Symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions, and cognitive problems characterize schizophrenia.

So far, however, researchers have been unable to find out exactly what causes this condition.

Full story at Medical News Today

What to know about phantom smells (phantosmia)

Phantosmia is the medical word used by doctors when a person smells something that is not actually there.

Phantosmia is also called a phantom smell or an olfactory hallucination. The smells vary from person to person but are usually unpleasant, such as burnt toast, metallic, or chemical smells.

Problems with the nose, such as sinusitis, or conditions of the nervous system or brain, including migraine, stroke, or schizophrenia can cause phantosmia.

In this article, we look at the causes and symptoms of phantosmia, when to see a doctor, and how to differentiate phantosmia from related conditions, such as parosmia.

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Could these food supplements help treat psychosis?

When added to standard early-stage treatment, certain food supplements may help to alleviate symptoms of psychotic illnesses such as schizophrenia.

This was the conclusion of a systematic review of data from eight trials involving hundreds of young people who received treatment during the early stages of psychosis.

The review was led by Dr. Joseph Firth, who is a research fellow with the NICM Health Research Institute at the University of Western Sydney in Australia and an honorary research fellow at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom.

Full story at Medical News Today

Smoking every day can increase psychosis risk, study finds

Two new studies report an increased risk of psychosis among smokers of not only marijuana, but tobacco, too.

The tobacco study has now been published in the journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, and the marijuana study — which was conducted by the same team — has now been published in The British Journal of Psychiatry.

Research has found links between psychosis and both tobacco and marijuana smoking — particularly in regard to schizophrenia-related psychosis.

Full story at Medical News Today

Teen marijuana use may lead to bipolar symptoms later on

It’s a well-known fact that many young people use cannabis, and studies have pointed to a link between the drug and psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia. However, the links between cannabis use and the development of bipolar symptoms over time have been insufficiently studied — until now.

A new study fills this research gap by examining how cannabis use among teenagers is linked with hypomania in early adulthood.

The research was led by Dr. Steven Marwaha, a clinical academic psychiatrist from the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, and the findings were published in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Full story at Medical News Today