Foods to eat and avoid when hungover

A hangover is a group of symptoms that commonly occur following excessive alcohol consumption.

The symptoms of a hangover vary from one person to another. However, most people experience headache, tiredness, and irritability. Nausea and excessive thirst are also common. The severity of these symptoms usually correlates with the amount of alcohol a person consumed.

Many people claim that certain foods and drinks can cure a hangover. While there is no actual “cure” for a hangover, research indicates that certain foods may help to alleviate hangover symptoms.

Full story at Medical News Today

How long does Xanax last?

Alprazolam (Xanax) is a useful medication for certain mental health conditions. Xanax starts to work quickly, and it stays in the body long after the effects of one dose have worn off.

Doctors often prescribe Xanax for generalized anxiety disorder or panic disorder. It is one of the most widely used medications for these conditions, and it belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines, or “benzos.”

Xanax works by increasing the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a neurotransmitter in the brain that increases feelings of calmness.

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Can you take Adderall and Xanax together?

Xanax is a benzodiazepine, while Adderall is a stimulant. Under the supervision of a doctor, the drugs may be safe to use together.

Benzodiazepines slow down activity in the central nervous system and can help a person feel more relaxed and less anxious. Stimulants, on the other hand, speed up central nervous system activity, helping a person feel more awake and focused.

Since these drugs have opposite effects on the central nervous system, they may work less well if a person takes them together.

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Doctors more likely to prescribe opioids later in the day

A vast array of known factors play a role in the current opioid crisis, and a recent study may have identified yet another. The authors conclude that doctors are more likely to prescribe opioids later in the day and when appointments are running late.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opioid-related drug deaths increased by 88% each year from 2013 to 2016.

Each day, more than 130 people in the United States died from opioid-related drug overdoses in 2017–2018.

Full story at Medical News Today

Chronic cocaine use modifies gene expression

Chronic cocaine use changes gene expression in the hippocampus, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.

Chronic drug users learn to associate the drug-taking environment with the drug itself, reinforcing memories that contribute to addiction. These memories are thought to be created by changes in gene expression in the hippocampus and potentially involve the gene FosB, but the exact mechanism is unknown.

A.J. Robinson and colleagues at Michigan State University examined how cocaine exposure affected expression of the FosB gene in the hippocampus. Mice that were administered cocaine daily showed increased expression of FosB compared to mice that received saline. Chronic cocaine use caused epigenetic modification of the gene, leading it to becoming more active. Additionally, when the scientists blocked the changes made to FosB, the mice were unable to form associations between cocaine and the environment where they received it, implicating epigenetic regulation of the gene in drug memory formation.

Full story at Science Daily