Can you drink alcohol with antibiotics?

Many people believe that mixing alcohol and antibiotics is not safe. Is it dangerous? What are the risks of drinking alcohol while taking antibiotics?

Antibiotics are drugs that target bacteria to treat and prevent infections. There are many types of oral antibiotic.

Not all antibiotics interact with alcohol, and doctors give different recommendations about alcohol depending on the type of antibiotic.

In this article, we discuss the risks of mixing antibiotics and alcohol. We also explore the effects of alcohol on the immune system.

Full story at Medical News Today

How college students can end up in vicious cycle of substance abuse, poor academics, stress

One negative behavior such as substance abuse or heavy alcohol drinking can lead college students toward a vicious cycle of poor lifestyle choices, lack of sleep, mental distress and low grades, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

“We used a robust data-mining technique to identify associations between mental distress in college students with substance abuse, sleep, social behaviors, academic attitude and behaviors, and GPA (short-term and long-term as reflective of academic performance),” said Lina Begdache, assistant professor of Health and Wellness Studies at Binghamton University. “Positive behaviors such as abstinence from substance use, studious attitudes and responsibility toward work and family are reflective of a brain chemistry profile that supports mood and maturation of the prefrontal cortex of the brain. The latter matures last and supports impulse and emotional control as well as rationalization of thoughts.

“Interestingly, we identified potential cyclic behaviors that associate with severe mental distress that are linked to a change in brain chemistry that supports substance abuse, poor academic attitude and performance, poor sleep patterns, and neglect of family and work. The novelty of these findings is that we are proposing, based on the neuroscience of these behaviors, that one action may be leading to another until a vicious cycle sets in.”

Full story at Science Daily

Experimental drug may ease opioid withdrawal symptoms

A drug that scientists originally developed to treat depression may have promise for the treatment of opioid withdrawal, researchers say.

Opioid withdrawal is a challenging experience, and although there are medications already on the market that can help curb the symptoms of withdrawal, these drugs cause negative side effects.

Current withdrawal medications also often require people to take them for a prolonged period, which is not ideal and could lead to a relapse.

Full story at Medical News Today

Senators Ask Juul for Information About Marketing E-Cigarettes to Youth

Eleven U.S. senators wrote a letter to e-cigarette maker Juul Labs this week, asking for information about the company’s marketing to youth, CNN reports.

The senators also asked about Juul’s relationship with tobacco company Altria, which invested almost $13 billion in the company in 2018.

“Altria has a long and sordid history of spending billions to entice children to smoke through targeted campaigns that intentionally lied about the science and health effects from cigarettes,” the letter says. It was signed by Democrats including Dick Durbin of Illinois, Ron Wyden of Oregon, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

Full story at drugfree.org

Opioids without the risk of addiction?

Scientists are working to develop medicines that have the pain-relieving effects of opioids without the high risk of misuse and addiction. Since misuse is linked to the euphoric effects of the drug, investigators led by scientists at NIDA’s intramural labs are studying methadone, a drug used to manage opioid addiction that does not have euphoric effects as strong as many other opioids.

Animal studies show that mu opioid receptors in the brain play a key role in the reinforcing effects of opioid drugs, whereas the neuropeptide galanin counteracts the effects of mu opioid receptors. In a recently published study, investigators found a significant difference in the mechanisms of action between methadone and morphine that is determined by the activation of opioid receptor complexes (heteromers) composed of both mu-opioid receptors and one of the galanin receptor subtypes; differences that are key to their subsequent effects on the brain’s dopamine system.

Full story at drugabuse.org