Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Common Comorbidities with Substance Use Disorders

Many individuals who develop substance use disorders (SUD) are also diagnosed with mental disorders, and vice versa.  This CEU course provides information on the state of the science in the comorbidity of substance use disorders with mental illness and physical health conditions.

Military and LGBTQ Adoptions and Foster Care

The adoption process can be challenging at times for any prospective adoptive family, but military and LGBTQ families may face special circumstance not experienced by other families.  This CEU course is designed to help expand cultural competence and skills when working with military and LGBTQ persons and examines laws and policies, benefits, potential challenges, and available resources.

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Quantum Units Education: New CEU Courses

Substance Abuse Confidentiality Regulations

This CEU course is intended to ensure that a patient receiving treatment for a substance use disorder (SUD) in a Part 2 program, Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records, does not face adverse consequences in relation to issues such as criminal proceedings and domestic proceedings such as those related to child custody, divorce, or employment. Part 2 protects the confidentiality of SUD patient records by restricting the circumstances under which Part 2 Programs or other lawful holders can disclose such records.

After a Suicide: A Toolkit for Schools

The suicide of a student can leave a school faced with grieving students, distressed parents and school staff, media attention, and a community struggling to understand what happened and why.  This CE course provides guidance and tools for activities that help people cope with the emotional distress resulting from a suicide and prevent additional trauma that could lead to further suicidal behavior and deaths.

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Featured News: Reduced Hospitalizations After Recovery Coach Contact in Patients With Substance Use Disorder

People with a substance use disorder (SUD) had lower hospitalizations after working with a recovery coach, a study presented at the recent American Society of Addiction Medicine annual meeting suggests. People with a SUD are almost twice as likely to be readmitted to the hospital compared to those without.

Patients’ visits to mental health and primary care outpatient services increased after recovery coach contact, the study found.

Recovery coaches are trained peers with a history of SUD. Although recovery coach interventions are being implemented nationwide, Dr. Magidson noted there is limited data to support their impact on costs or clinical outcomes.

Full story at drugfree.org

Innovative Sheriff-led Initiatives for Offenders with Substance Use Disorders

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, drug overdose deaths are increasing in the United States, with the majority of those overdose deaths (more than six out of 10) involving an opioid. Alarmingly, over 91 people die each day from opioid overdoses.

Law enforcement officers are often the first on the scene to find someone overdosing, and as a result, many of those who use substances find themselves involved in the criminal justice system. The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse estimates that nearly two-thirds of the nation’s 2.3 million inmates in jails and prisons have a substance use disorder (SUD).

Full story of officer initiative and substance use disorder at drugfree.org

Commentary: Eliminating Barriers IS Smart Drug and Crime Policy

Smart drug policy is inextricably linked to smart crime policy. When treatment of substance use disorders (SUD) is the primary response to criminal behavior tied to untreated addiction and use, it has a profound impact on reducing not only costs to the public safety system but also to the health care system. However, crime and drug policy do not end there. Ensuring the successful reintegration of justice-involved individuals into the community is equally important to ensuring that people get the care and supports they need. Yet many people in recovery face an overwhelming array of discriminatory barriers as a result of their addiction and/or criminal histories, which make it difficult to obtain employment, housing, education, public benefits, and other necessities of life.

During the 1980s and 1990s, the nation engaged in a “war on drugs” that led to the United States having the largest incarcerated population in the world. Legislators enacted policies that erected collateral consequences or extended punishment for people with drug convictions beyond completion of their sentences. These policies stripped away from millions of people, including many in recovery, rights and eligibility for vital services. While in most cases, states were permitted to opt out of these bans, the message across the country was clear.

Full story of drug and crime policy at drugfree.org