NIH-funded study finds teens prefer mint and mango vaping flavors

A new analysis suggests that teens prefer mint and mango as their vaping flavors of choice for e-cigarettes. Previous research showed that teens were attracted to nicotine vaping by the candy and fruit-flavored products offered by manufacturers. Products and trends are quickly evolving, and estimates of the specific e-cigarette flavors teens use are lacking; therefore, scientists wanted to find out which flavors are now preferred by teens. The report, published in JAMA, was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Cancer Institute, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products.

The study focused on JUUL products, the most widely used brand, which is available in multiple flavors. Data were from the 2019 Monitoring the Future (MTF) study, which annually surveys eighth, 10th, and 12th grade students in U.S. schools. A randomly-selected third of MTF respondents were asked, “Which JUUL flavor do you use most often?”

Full story at National Institute of Drug Abuse

The rate of teen vaping has doubled within two years, new research finds

The rates of eighth, 10th and 12th graders who use e-cigarettes continued to rise this year and doubled from 2017 to 2019, according to research released Wednesday.

In 2019, one in four 12th grade students said they vaped within the previous 30 days, as well as one in five students in 10th grade and one in 11 in eighth, research published in the New England Journal of Medicine says.
There were also significant increases from 2018 to 2019 in the numbers of students who said they had vaped during the previous 12 months and who had ever vaped.
“Current efforts by the vaping industry, government agencies, and schools have thus far proved insufficient to stop the rapid spread of nicotine vaping among adolescents,” researchers wrote. “Of particular concern are the accompanying increases in the proportions of youth who are physically addicted to nicotine, an addiction that is very difficult to overcome once established.”

Teens and Young Adults Should Avoid E-Cigarettes, CDC Advises

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is investigating at least 215 possible cases of severe lung disease associated with vaping. Teens and young adults should not use e-cigarettes, the agency said. Adults who do not currently use tobacco products should not start using e-cigarette products, the CDC advised.

Cases of lung disease linked to e-cigarettes have been reported in 25 states, according to HealthDay. Additional reports of lung disease are being investigated by states to determine whether those illnesses are related to e-cigarette use, the CDC said.

An adult in Illinois recently died after being hospitalized with a severe respiratory illness after vaping, the article notes.

Full story at Partnership for Drug-Free-Kids

Juul Will Stop Selling Flavored E-Cigarette Pods to Stores

The e-cigarette company Juul Labs announced this week it will stop selling most of its flavored e-cigarette pods in retail stores, The New York Times reports. The company will also shut down its social media accounts.

The company made its announcement in the face of increasing government pressure and a public outcry over teenage vaping, the article notes.

“As of this morning, we stopped accepting retail orders for our Mango, Fruit, Creme, and Cucumber JUUL pods to the over 90,000 retail stores that sell our product, including traditional tobacco retailers (e.g., convenience stores) and specialty vape shops,” the company said Tuesday in a news release.

Full story at drugfree.org

Vaping popular among teens; opioid misuse at historic lows

Nearly 1 in 3 students in 12th grade report past year use of some kind of vaping device, raising concerns about the impact on their health. What they say is in the device, however, ranges from nicotine, to marijuana, to “just flavoring.” The survey also suggests that use of hookahs and regular cigarettes is declining. These findings come from the 2017 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey of eighth, 10th and 12th graders in schools nationwide, reported today by the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, along with scientists from the University of Michigan, who conduct the annual research. The survey asks teens about “any vaping” to measure their use of electronic vaporizers. It is important to note that some research suggests that many teens do not actually know what is in the device they are using, and even if they read the label, not all labeling is consistent or accurate.

The survey shows that 27.8 percent of high school seniors reported “vaping” in the year prior to the survey, which was taken in the beginning of 2017. When asked what they thought was in the mist they inhaled the last time they used the vaping device, 51.8 percent of 12th graders said, “just flavoring,” 32.8 percent said “nicotine,” and 11.1 percent said “marijuana” or “hash oil.” The survey also asks about vaping with specific substances during the past month. Among 12th graders, more than 1 in 10 say they use nicotine, and about 1 in 20 report using marijuana in the device.

Full story at drugabuse.gov